Suggestions

Here, I will take any suggestions anyone has for movies I should view and subsequently rip (or not).  Also, at times I will humbly accept guest posts for anyone who feels a rabid desire to prove why “Amistad” represents everything that is wrong with film making.  Below I have listed the movies I plan on watching already in a vague chronological order.  They are divided into categories, but these categories of history will go vaguely from early to recent.  At the very bottom of the list you will find movies based on pieces of literature.

For the time being I will likely focus on films that are set in a time before any of us were around.  I would like to cover events in the 20th century, including wars up to Vietnam and perhaps events in the 1960s (American civil rights, JFK, etc.) but I don’t feel like much that happens after that will fit in with the spirit of the blog.  Dissecting a movie for inaccuracies, costume choices, and attitudes for something about the 1980s doesn’t really serve to inform or illuminate.

As another note, if you have any good suggestions for biographies or other relevant scholastic works for movies I plan to watch, please let me know!  Or, if you want to see an article about something listed more than something else listed, you can list your opinion about that here too.

Ancient Rome/Greece, Hellenistic World

Gladiator

– Spartacus

– Caligula

– Masada

– Alexander (Director’s Cut)

The Eagle

– Centurion

– Julius Caesar (mini series)

– Cleopatra

Ancient/Classical Asia

– Red Cliff

Medieval era Asia (1000s-1300s)

– Mongol: The Rise of Genghis Khan (not an American film, but not focused on western events, so I like that)

Medieval/Renaissance Europe

Braveheart

– Robin Hood

Anne of the Thousand Days

– Elizabeth

– Elizabeth: The Golden Age

Shakespeare in Love

– Luther

– Lion in Winter

– Becket

– Kingdom of Heaven

– Amadeus

– Joan of Arc

– Anonymous

The Americas (North and South)

– The Other Conquest

– Apocalypto

– The Royal Hunt of the Sun

Japanese History

– The Last Samurai

– Yojimbo

– Sanjuro

Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries

– Quills

Immortal Beloved

– Catherine the Great

– Marie Antoinette

American Revolution/Early American Colonizing

– The New World/Pocahontas

– The Patriot

– 1776 (I know it’s a musical, but we could talk about the Founding Fathers!)

– Amistad

American Western

– Wyatt Earp

– Tombstone

– The Alamo

American Civil War

– Glory

Gettysburg

– Gods and Generals

– Ride with the Devil

Turn of the Century

– Titanic

World War I/World War II

– Saving Private Ryan

– Pearl Harbor

– Lawrence of Arabia

– Bridge on the River Kwai

– Patton

– The Great Escape

– Battle of Britain

Cold War/ 1960s

– Che

– Hamburger Hill

Television Series

– The Tudors

– The Borgias

– Rome

– Spartacus: Blood and Sand

– Deadwood

– The Pillars of the Earth (mini-series)

– Hell on Wheels

Literature

– The Three Musketeers

– Troy

– King Arthur/First Knight

– Tristan and Isolde

– Beowulf

NOTICE: This is a preliminary list.  There will be more movies.  PLEASE, if you have any good tips on movies based in Asia, Africa, or Latin America, let me know.  I want to avoid being completely Western based.  If there are a lack of movies based in these places, we can discuss why that is too.

9 responses to “Suggestions

  1. Pierre the Novel

    Mongol: The Rise of Genghis Khan (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0416044/)
    1776 (American Revolution)
    Andersonville (Civil War)
    All Quiet on the Western Front (WWI)
    Bridge on the River Kwai (WWII)

  2. The Messenger: The Story of Joan of Arc (100 Years War)
    Glory (Civil War)
    Seven Samurai (Warring States Period in Japan)
    Jet Li’s Fearless (Life of Huo Yuanjia (kind of))
    Legend Quest (TV Series, so bad it turns my soul to tears)
    Enemy at the Gates (Battle of Stalingrad)
    Valkyrie (Tom Cruise Kills Hitler)
    Memphis Belle (WWII – Story of the Bomber Memphis Belle)
    Flyboys (WWI – Story of American voulenteers prior to US entry to the War)
    Band of Brothers (WWII – TV Series)
    Rob Roy (18th Century Scotland)
    The Count of Monte Cristo (Literature)
    Remember the Titans (60s Football Racial Issues)
    The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Old West)

    • Thanks for the suggestions! I’ve seen a couple of these, I remember quite liking The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Will definitely look into the rest of these. I have heard fantastic things about Band of Brothers – maybe there could be some sort of special post about that in conjunction with The Pacific.

  3. A few suggestions:
    -Deadwood (American West-TV Series)
    -The Alamo (2004 Version)
    -Battle of Britain (WWII)
    -Patton (WWII)
    -The Great Escape (WWII)
    -Battle of the Bulge (WWII)
    -The Longest Day (WWII)
    -A Bridge Too Far (WWII)
    -Pork Chop Hill (Korean War)
    -Hamburger Hill (Vietnam War)
    -Yojimbo (Feudal Japan)
    -Sanjuro (Same as Above)
    -Rashomon (Again…)
    -Thirteen Days (Cuban Missile Crisis)
    -The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones (All the Episodes with Sean Patrick Flanery)
    -Untouchables (Prohibition-Era Chicago)
    -Goodfellas (1960’s/70’s/80’s Mafia)

    I will post others as I think of them.

  4. Defiance (WWII)

  5. The Passion of the Christ :O

  6. Hi there
    Please see the correction below
    This is your words from your review of ‘The Eagle’

    The size of the legion

    An entire legion all told would have about 5,000 men. What confused me was that Marcus said his father was in charge of the first cohort of the Ninth legion. A cohort would be considerably smaller than a legion. At the most basic organizational level of the army you had centuries. Each century typically had about 80 men. A cohort would be made up of six centuries, for a told of about 480 men. The beginning of the film tells us that all 5,000 men of the Ninth legion disappeared, and everybody blames Marcus’ father. But, in charge of a cohort, he would only have been responsible for 480 of those men, and therefore wouldn’t be the center of disgrace. The numbers don’t really add up.

    The centurion in charge of the first cohort was known as the chief centurion, he ranks higher than all other centurions (who were known as senior centurions) commanding the other cohorts. Therefore the numbers do add up 🙂

    • Hey Stephen!

      As always, I appreciate comments on my accuracy (sorry it’s taken me awhile to respond). I’m looking at some information, and I’m not going to pretend to be an expert on army logistics, but from what I see it says that the first centurion is also the primus pilus. He would be in charge of the first centurion of the first cohort which was typically 800 men instead of the 480. I do think he would be more responsible for the entire legion as one of the only people who outranked him would be the legate (who is in charge of the legion), but I think that technically everyone should be blaming the legate.

      Let me know if I’m wrong on this one! I’ll do some editing.

  7. I am looking forward to you ripping apart Robin Hood. I kinda feel bad that you have to watch it though.

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